Corsica’s picturesque southernmost town Bonifacio gazes across the blue Mediterranean to Sardinia. In its narrow cobbled alleys lingers a strangely medieval mood and the ancient stone houses of the fortress-like, once much-besieged community cling to one of the island’s most striking sites – a towering promontory of sheer limestone rock jutting out improbably into the sea 200ft below. Founded about AD 828 as a defence against pirates, the town was taken from Pisa at the end of the 12th century by the Genoese and remained under the influence of Genoa until modern times.