Today, residents of Nessebur live mostly from fishing and tourism. Nesebur sits on a small rocky peninsula connected to the mainland by a narrow isthmus. Remnants of the 2nd century city walls rise above the town and the winding, cobblestone streets are lined with stone and timber houses with wooden stairways and jutting first floors. Another characteristic of Nessebur architecture are horizontal strips of white stone and red brick offset by striped blind arches resting on vertical pilasters, the facades highlighted by ceramic discs and rosettes. Other sights include the Museum of Archaeology – a new museum housing a fascinating collection of some 5,000 relics and finds that have been salvaged from archaeological sites of the ancient town of Nessebur.