As the Kvarner Riviera’s biggest city, Rijeka has a vibrant nightlife and is a hub of industrial trade and more of a springboard from where to depart to other scenic towns along the coastline. Stroll the Korzo, a pedestrian street lined with restaurants and shops. View the City Tower, built between the 16th and 19th centuries and decorated by four clocks crafted in the 18th century. The Roman Arch, once part of a fortress and possibly connected to the rule of Emperor Claudius II, and the Church of St. Vitus (13th century) both give a look into Rijeka’s past. Legend says  that the medieval cross found within St. Vitus once lead to a man being consumed by the earth, after he had thrown a rock at the crucifix. Rijeka’s history is varied and stems from its ancient role as an Illyrian settlement in the 2nd century BCE, when it was part of the Roman Empire. It went through numerous rulers and kingdoms over the centuries, from the medieval Croatian Kingdom to the Hapsburg Empire, from the Austro-Hungarians to being annexed by Mussolini. Having not been a free city since the 17th century, in 1947 Rijeka was finally part of Croatia in Yugoslavia. Experience 19th century architecture at the Ivan Zajc National Theatre, where you can still enjoy performances. Museums, galleries, fine dining and more make exploring the city an interesting way to spend thet afternoon, or you can hop on a bus to go further down the coast to Bivio to enjoy the beach and seaside strolling.